Posted in September 2014

Let’s Get Quizzical

Nature of Event: Let’s Get Quizzical  is a quiz show with canapés at PJ O’Brien’s Irish Pub. The MC is a master of quizzes and craic: Brian Gillespie. The questions will be broad-ranging, but it may be a tad advantageous to be Irish, or to know your way around matters sporting (the man is a … Continue reading

Walking Old Sydney

Walking Old Sydney

In 2012 The Dictionary of Sydney developed a partnership with the Irish Consulate Sydney to develop new content. This project became known as Greening the Dictionary and saw eight new entries come online in 2013. These entries included St Canice’s Church, Elizabeth Bay; Irish in Sydney from First Fleet to Federation; and the surprising, Statue of Queen Victoria in Druitt Street. Continue reading

Poetry

Poetry

The Country Shop to the memory of Mullarkey’s shop, Listrisnane, Bohola, Co. Mayo Sorrow is where a unit of shop, house and home have shut – a stronghold clinging to the bend like a rainbow spanning an ark from the hills above down to the crossroads. Mother, steadfast as the Angelus bell among bags of … Continue reading

A Socialist Insurgent

A Socialist Insurgent

This is a thoughtful, well-balanced, sensibly structured and extremely well-written book. Supported by a ‘Timeline’ of Connolly’s life and times, a useful and clear map of central Dublin in 1916, a selection of interesting photographs (some of which were new to me) an extensive bibliography and a couple of short appendices containing some of Connolly’s writings (including a number of his ballads and poems) the author presents a really clear and concise introduction to Connolly. Continue reading

Brutalised by Prison, and with a Thirst for Revenge

Brutalised by Prison, and with a Thirst for Revenge

Chapter Two, ‘ Prisoner Number J464, 1883-98′ is the fulcrum of this book. It concentrates in detail on the British prison system of those times and Litton has done meticulous research to justify her conclusion that Clarke suffered so badly and permanently that it led to his utter thirst for revenge and a military solution against English oppression. Continue reading